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April 2, 2022

Happy Birthday Aspiring Young Chef Olivia


Today on the show, we welcome a young aspiring Chef Olivia Kent Horton. What's special about Olivia is today as we release this episode, April 2, 2022. It's her 17th birthday. She loves the culinary arts, cooking, gardening, and food deserts. Come along her childhood journey and listen to an amazing storyteller at such young age.

Connect to Olivia: Olivia05kh@gmail.com.

Connect to Voice4Chefs: https://www.voice4chefs.com/

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/MichaelDugan)

Transcript

Michael Dugan:

Today on the show, we welcome a young aspiring chef Olivia Kent Horton. What's special about Olivia is today as we release this episode, April 2 2022. It's her 17th birthday. She loves the culinary arts, cooking, gardening, and food deserts. And I'm so excited to dedicate this episode to Olivia and Olivia. Happy birthday, and welcome to the show. Hi. Hi. This is me. Welcome, Olivia. I'm so excited to have you here. I know we've been planning on this for a long time and I can't I can't wait to have this conversation with you. So let's get started. Let's let's take take everyone back to when you were growing up. Now you're 16 now so when you were four or five? What did things look like?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Well, I just want to say when I was little I was told that I used to eat everything. When I was never picky. My parents would go Yeah, you did this when he was little Why don't you eat it now and they would still do when I was five. But I think the main thing I would bring up is cookbooks, specifically Princess cookbooks. I love Disney Princesses I loved I love Disney anything at the time, anything that like all the princesses, but ballerinas and they would have character books. I remember a specific Disney one. And it was Disney Princess cookbooks and I think it actually got me into a little bit of mixology, too, because there are drinks in there.

Michael Dugan:

I would just wait. What kind of drinks today?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Oh non alcoholic, I promise. Sure. Sure. It was like mixing filters. You can make coffee for your parents. And it was just so interesting to me because I I would do like I want to do this one today. Mom, I just this one and then I want to do this one. And then at first my mom if I couldn't do it to make it for my lunch. Okay, to bring it with me the next day at school. It was my favorite thing. I remember. My favorite recipe was popcorn.

Michael Dugan:

Popcorn. Tell us about that. Yes,

Olivia Kent-Horton:

it was a popcorn with strawberry gelatin, butter, and sometimes cream cheese and marshmallows and you would mix them together on low heat for a little while. Basically it would come up with this sticky consistency that you would put on top of the popcorn. I think it was my favorite because it was almost always pink. But I never used to cook because on my other side of my family, my family could do jam. They could like make homemade jam and bagels matches which is so confusing to me. I was like no, I can't do it. So I will be with my popcorn just started on the stove and then I put my pretty popcorn. We do confetti and holidays. I loved giving people holiday bowls of popcorn. Okay, they were a little sticky, but I think they taste good to this day.

Michael Dugan:

And how old were you?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

I think I had to be five to seven because I just loved it. I would always be there on the stove cooking it.

Michael Dugan:

No, I know that your passion never died. So what happened after that? After I want to say it was middle school. My school had a cooking class and I couldn't join because I had already credits I needed to do. So I was like you know what, it's fun. I'm going to cook at home so I started looking at recipes and you know the whole of Pinterest. I went down that whole down the hole of Pinterest. I was seeing all these aesthetic foods. I wanted to make breakfast where how to make dinner for my family. It was also really good practice. For what I do today. I like to make dinner almost every night at my house. What were you cooking back then pastas?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

I loved pastas. At the time I wasn't a big seafood fan and my parents like seafood so I could cook seafood such as shrimp or salmon. Or a lot of halibut. My mom loves halibut. And I would cook that a lot. But I was like no, I'm not gonna eat it. And now I'm starting to get my flavor back. I'm starting to enjoy seafood a little bit. I think last month I first had my own crab that I was able to cook in butter, just going into Pinterest seeing how pretty food looked. And then actually being able to put it down and then taste it and be like, Oh my gosh, it started growing confidence in me with my food and also a really good connection with how I wanted to eat and how I wanted to cook and how I wanted to share my cookie to other people.

Michael Dugan:

As you're going along. You started creating pastas. Did anything change after that?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Right now I'm trying to add in more into my pasta. I just made a Fettuccine Alfredo salmon, which I was told was really good. So I tried it. And I like it. I'm starting to like Oh, I really like to culture my food now. If there's something from a different culture that's like I can get authentically and make it authentically, I love to try my hardest. There's a new tea that I really like and it's called Jujubee tea. However, I had to go to the Asian market to get it because there were specific red dates that you have to have in them. And pears and I love pear so I was like oh my gosh, two for one. And I loved it. So now I start drinking it almost every week.

Michael Dugan:

So what market we're in Seattle, but what market do you go to?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Oh no, I think it's in Redmond. Let me double check. But there there's not much around me right now. I live to see Samamish area, which honestly, I kind of like because when I go shopping for food, it's kind of like shopping for clothes. Like I'm going to this fancy place. I'm going to go into a totally different culture. I'm expanding my palate and that's kind of I think my favorite thing with cooking with other cultures. I just learned how to create Jollof rice and oh my gosh, it was so good. It was so good.

Michael Dugan:

I haven't heard of that. What is that?

Unknown:

It's an African tradition and depending on who you ask, one country will say is Nigeria as the other will say Somalian Jollof rice is basically rice balls, I guess you would say and I put them in rice bowls, and it's a dish from West Africa. And you typically put onions green rice, tomatoes, vegetables and all these a lot of spices which is probably my favorite and vegetables and meat and just a pot and you're just cooking and cooking. And I had it as a side dish. But I loved it. I love side dishes. Those are my favorite.

Michael Dugan:

Do you know or could you tell us what spices go into it?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

I could tell you what we use. Okay, we use a lot of Tumeric which is one of my favorites paprika tomato powder. I also like to put in tomatoes if there's a vegetable powder I love to put in the actual vegetable, tomato powder, onions bell peppers. Ohh red chili pepper. That's number one. Surprisingly, we put in dried honey, which is really cool to me because I don't really work. I don't know exactly how to mix flavors together. So the sweet and sour. That's not my biggest strong suit but I really love playing with it. So dried honey garlic salt, bay leaf thyme, nutmeg, coriander, black pepper, cumin, ginger. Oh, and we did have clothes which I really did like.

Michael Dugan:

Now that sounds really really good.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Yeah, I love it. I love getting into see other people's cultured foods and then just eating it and then if I can make it that's even better. It's like, I feel like I'm doing more representation in my palate. Sometimes it's typically a lot healthier. I love just adding it it in.

Michael Dugan:

That sounds like a very complex dish with a lot incredible flavor.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

I did it with my friend's mom and we had kind of like a sleepover and she was like Olivia, do you want to learn? I was like, You know what I would love to

Michael Dugan:

Oh, that's so amazing.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

I would love to learn. Yeah, everyone is super nice up here. But with the culture is a little less diverse. Not in Seattle. But where I live in Spanish. And to be able to go over to friend's house and have their parents go, I'll show you how to cook this or yeah, I'll bring this food in for you. So you can try it at your lunch. It's just, it's amazing.

Michael Dugan:

I remember being at a friend's house and, you know, you go you go to someone's house and because you're a chef or because you're a cook, they always ask you questions, and they were having a challenge around gravy, a turkey gravy, and I said oh it's so simple and they're like Well could you make the gravy so I ended up showing my friend's mom How To Make a Good gravy and we started out very simply with a room which is just you know it's a mixture of butter and flour equal parts and you heat one up and the other ones cold so you had cold liquid too hot or hot liquid to cold. So you mix the butter and flour and then you add like if you're cooking it you would add cold stock to that and then thicken it and the trick is if you do it that way, it never never comes out lumpy and so I would make it with that and some fresh thyme and some, you know some onions and shallots, a little bit of garlic and after it came to a boil, finish it off with some a little bit of white wine like a white wine shallow reduction, and it seemed very complicated to them but it's really a simple method and a series of steps and if you do it that way, you never have a lumpy gravy so I gained that reputation with one every time I go to somebody Thanksgiving dinner. It's like what you make the gravy, of how to do it. So the next time they could do it. So when you talk about that exchange, you know, within families and within friends, it's a very powerful thing that people sometimes forget how important it is to pass it on. And so it's really great that she did that with you. Yeah. And speaking of that, are there any chefs that you follow right now?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Oh, well, I have a whole tick tock list, but I'll share generics because a lot of them a lot of the trends that a lot of chefs are doing on tick tock it's not just one it's many and I think I can share my favorite trend right now is taking fast food and turn it into a gourmet meal. And I think that might be my favorite because it makes me look at ingredients differently. So you'll have like a bring in a burger and french fries and say here give me something. I want it gourmet I'll pay however much for it. And the chefs are not just using for taking out the buns, but then they're using the buns again, they're using the burger. They try to use everything they can in this dish and then it just comes out beautifully. And I think that was a really good lesson to learn. Every time I see it. I'm like, oh well they could never use that and what they're using and then he uses it. I find it amazing to see how other chefs can gourmet something or just think about ingredients differently. And that's why I think one of my favorite trends right now currently.

Michael Dugan:

Is there a specific chef that you follow or is it or a lot of people doing this?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Almost every chef I follow has done something like this is my favorite thing to see when it comes to culinary. I really love watching people play with ingredients. And I think it's even cooler when it comes out pretty. It's very aesthetic. I love looking at aesthetic food to me healthy, pretty food is aesthetic immediately. So it's really nice to look at it. And it's just amazing what the Chefs do. I'm trying to go through my my phone right now.

Michael Dugan:

As we're doing that. I remember among clubhouse and oh yeah, clubhouse there are chefs from all over the world. And we're gonna have a few of those on in the upcoming episodes actually in Australia in the Philippines I think the UK as well so connected with a bunch of them in Canada. What I found fascinating is clubhouse has these rooms where people go in they and they have conversations because there's no video it's just audio what's so interesting about it is that these chefs from all over the world have these conversations and anyone can come up and join in the conversation and they were talking about plating food and how the art of plating food, keep it really safe. And my favorite it's such an art and it was so amazing to listen to them describe different strategies about what they do and about how we eat with our eyes. And I just found it really, really interesting. So you you kind of just drew that out of me but I wanted to share that with our with you and our listeners.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

I mean, I think I used to watch this. This is gonna be me bringing it back to what TV shows I would watch for I would watch Gordon Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares. Yeah. And then once I got into that I was sometimes watch. I'm forgetting the name of it where they have people come in and then they're on specific teams red and blue teems, Hell's Kitchen, I would watch that a lot. And it would be the simple thing of how he would plate things. You know, you think you'd come out so extravagant. And he would be like, No, you don't have to do all that you just got to do this and it will look even better. And I would love that the critiques that he would make on how to make it look that people are looking with their eyes first, and how to make it look that it's simple and classy, but that you really want it and then it just looks good. And I was like yeah, I really love learning about that.

Michael Dugan:

And it's interesting that you mentioned Gordon Ramsay because many people think that he is you know, angry chef and he's not. My cousin met him and said he was such a nice guy, and so genuine.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

I hear that a lot too. I'm like, I don't know.

Michael Dugan:

We just signed up for masterclass my wife's watching Steve Martin comedy but Gordon Ramsay is also on there. So I'm actually working class with him. A masterclass. So, that should be as should be a lot of fun.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

That sounds so exciting.

Michael Dugan:

So moving on for all of us. The past year or so has been really tough because of COVID and the pandemic and everything. How have you survived the pandemic? How have you coped with it in your life?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

A lot have did happen during a COVID for me, I mean, I was in my freshman year when COVID started. So I think for me at first, let's talk food wise, I never ate which sounds really strange, because it was kind of like the discipline was gone, I could chill, I could do whatever I want, but I couldn't go outside. So I was like, Oh my gosh, me and my extroverted self. I was just there. Like, I can't do anything. And then I started going through my Pinterest again thinking, Wait a minute, I actually have time in my day now to cook what I would want to cook and what I would want to eat for lunch because right now my school starts at 730 a little too early for me. So I don't get to like cook my lunch sometimes.Sometimes, I actually can cook my lunch and I love it. I mean recently I just made spam fried rice. For me and my friends. It was great. But that was like the first time in like, I think two weeks that I've been truly able to cook my lunch. So during COVID I was like you know what? I'm taking this opportunity and I would I probably shouldn't say this depending on which teachers are listening but some classes. I would just start cooking my lunch a little extra early. I would go in with salmon pasta, I think what am I I tried Wellington. Oh, it didn't work out perfectly. But you know what I liked it. It was spicy. Well, but the cooking I was a little off. That's a tough dish. It is. So it just gave me a lot of time at first I was like, Oh, I'm just gonna be lazy. I'm just gonna chill. And then I realized, oh wait, this is probably going to be a little bit of a long term thing. And you know my school still kind of experiencing that in between and I was like, Okay, I have time to cook what I want. Do what I want and not have to worry about going actually into school physically and that just like sparked an interest in me. I started getting into mixology. I know I talked about that a little bit little bit. Not with alcohol. There's a place called Mercurys. It's actually kind of popular. I'm not exactly sure how many are in Seattle, but I would go there and I would see them do juice and they're just so fast. And I think my favorite was an Italian pomegranate soda. I love the flavor pomegranate and I was watching something. I was like what if I made a pomegranate balsamic vinegar to go with my salads. Wow, I may or may not have spent at least two class periods. Just testing that out, tried it figuring out how to make it figuring out what syrup I might need. And it was just great. So it gave me time to practice and it gave me time to eat what I wanted to eat. I'm starting to figure out how to get back into that when we're going back and out of school. A lot of meal prep is going into that but I loved it. It was perfect once I started getting the hang of being able to like okay, I can cook this and also made my cooking faster. I used to be really slow cook and now I'm speeding up slowly.

Michael Dugan:

Now you're making me hungry. You know? It is almost lunchtime, but that's okay. I'm really enjoying learning about your passion for cooking and you've lived in Seattle for all of your life.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Yeah, most of it I made when I was five. I lived there till I was five I was adopted. And they brought us to Seattle and they were like Seattle is number one. And I was like yep, okay, I accept it. And then I think when I was like five to six, we moved to Sammamish which is is close to Seattle about 45 minutes, but I remember I would constantly be like, No, we have to go back to this place in Seattle. And so now I kind of made it my mission to make my parents bring me back to Seattle every day. I think my favorite area to go was Pike Place Market. Oh my gosh, the food scene the seafood out I would just have a field day I didn't even like seafood at the time. I was like so pretty. I want all of it the fresh produce. I would just I was in love. It was a field day.

Michael Dugan:

Oh for sure. It's definitely an amazing experience to walk through Pike Place and I love for our listeners who may not have done this and maybe they will in the future and come to Seattle and watch them throw the fish.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Oh yes. experience you have to see it's beautiful.

Michael Dugan:

There's a lot to the Pike Place Market. And speaking of Seattle, if I was to visit from let's say, I don't know Australia. I've a really good friend in Australia named Jody. And if Jodi was to come visit where would you take her with three places would you take her to?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Well, number one, I'd have to say Pike Place Market number one, my favorite place. I think I'd also go to a local farmers market. It's very shift because I think for me, stores were just like, Oh, they're just a store. I'm just gonna walk in, I'll just grab something real quickly. But at a market I could take my time. I could just enjoy the aesthetic of being at a farmers market enjoy helping other businesses. I'm a really big farm to table and I loved that my mom loves that too. You know, like okay, get your first produce now. So we can get it for next week. And I love that so I think Pike Place Market and other like farmers markets because we have a lot of those.

Michael Dugan:

So what produce do you get at the farmers market?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Oh, I'm a fruit person. So it depends on the fruit. I love peaches. I love apples. I love any type of berry that I can cook with recently. I love making my mom's smoothies sometimes for breakfast because they're really close and they wake me up. They're very easy. I'm like, Okay, what do you want? Let me put it in. Okay, we're good. Oh, what else? I love lettuce. That sounds really weird, but I never really liked getting lettuce for my stores. So I'll get lettuce I'll be like okay, do I want to have a salad with this? I'll just prepare it now and then I've got lettuce other than that. I also just love looking at communities that are there. A lot of people have pop up shops, a lot of people I know sometimes the Samamish Police department will come and do some community work the YMCA so it's a good thing to know what's in the area and what's trying to reach out to us.

Michael Dugan:

It sounds like you spent a lot of time in farmers markets. Yes. You know, my mom was a local artist. Patricia Dugan she was she painted lots of different things. But her signature was lighthouses. She would sell them at the Redmond farmers market for many, many years. She was part of the Redmond farmers market. And so I spent a lot of time there. And I love farmers markets too. And Seattle has some amazing ones. Yeah, so moving on. Are there any special projects that you've been involved with, with cooking or

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Oh, one project? I think this might have with food? to be my favorite person in the world. Well, at least favorite chef for now. I don't know if you've heard Ron Finley. He teaches gardening however, I'm like I said a really big person when it comes to farm to table or at least fresh food be distributed. And I learned about desert food deserts when I think it was. I know a little bit about middle school. I know now more in high school about basically geological differences but also social differences between classes and then what food gets distributed to other people. A project that I would love to currently work on still is basically creating easier gardening tools and outreach into community so that they can make their own food, grow their own food so that they can have it and then if not for like a specific household, a specific community. Ron Finely is really popular for basically making a gardening system in areas that you would not think gardening would work for specific communities, specifically black Latino X communities. And then basically allowing anyone to come into the garden and take their food as long as they upkeep it. I mean, he teaches gardening, how to make sure everything's watered and how to work with soil that doesn't work. So I would love to do something like that in Seattle.

Michael Dugan:

That is really, really amazing. So now we're gonna move on to one of my favorite parts. And we did a little cooking already along the way, but can you tell me three of your favorite signature dishes that you like? To cook?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Oh, salmon. I love salmon. That is my favorite thing. Any type of salmon. I know I love seafood boils and I like to make my salmon for my parents with shrimp as well. I'm kind of an Italian kind of spice salmon and then my new favourite is teriyaki salmon. Because I love sushi and that's my new reason. I'm still kind of getting the feels of it. Little soy sauce teriyaki. Definitely more of a seafood kind of err I'm kind of in right now. I guess I'll say an original pasta, specifically. red sauce pasta. I love red sauce. I actually learned how to make my own meatballs, which is really cool.

Michael Dugan:

Oh, wow.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

So now whenever I get to practice them like okay, we're having spaghetti.

Michael Dugan:

That is awesome. And your family is really lucky.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

I mean, sometimes I take it over my new rule is that if I cook they have to clean up after me.

Michael Dugan:

You know, that's a very, very good rule because it really creative and you spend a lot of time in the kitchen and you spend a lot of time planning. I think that's a that's a really good trade off. I think it's a great trade off too soon to talk about salmon in Seattle. We're famous for it. Because we're in the Pacific Northwest, which is where salmon comes from. You know, we also have Alaska king salmon which is really amazing. And I think it's Copper River salmon. Alaska is famous and is really good. But have you ever tried cedar plank

Olivia Kent-Horton:

I have added is so good. Oh my god. I love salmon? experiencing the salmon. I think my most fun project with salmon was salmon nuggets which I saw from tic toc which is basically chicken nuggets but they're salmon through I tried a few different ways to cook it but no, I've never tried that. And I really want to I want to move on in my experience.

Michael Dugan:

A little bit. Yeah, let me share a little bit something to try. What's great is you can get cedar planks in Safeway or QFC or the local grocery stores in Seattle and there's a recipe on the back but basically one of the ways you can do it is the key. The key to a cedar plank salmon is that you have to soak the wood so it doesn't burn because you put it on the barbecue and you put the fish over the barbecue. You can do different things with it but it's usually like a combination of brown sugar, five spice powder and cinnamon and things like that. And it creates its own sauce as it's called. So it's almost like a teriyaki but it also smokes the get the smoke from the cedar it is out of this world. So I'm going to give you that challenge Olivia. When the summer hits to try it and I think your family and you will be very excited about it. I got home

Olivia Kent-Horton:

I definitely will try it.

Michael Dugan:

So that's one that's one I definitely would share and and for our listeners if you can get salmon. If you can get salmon you can definitely get a cedar plank. And it's really simple to do. It's probably four or five ingredients. But the key is you have to soak the word so it doesn't burn or catch on fire. Speaking of fires. Let's move on to a question I asked all our chefs and our friends voice for chefs have you ever had a kitchen disaster?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Oh, okay. I'm gonna expose myself a little.

Michael Dugan:

I was gonna say,

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Well, I can think of two things. One is when I was little I was growing up and my I advise everyone to try this. My mom had a specific recipe of eggs, and I could never figure out why hers were different and I used to be so upset. I was like, No, it has to be you because when I cook my eggs they burn which I still have an issue cooking eggs, which is very strange to me, but only if it's her eggs and her eggs are Canadian bacon cooked Canadian bacon chopped with a eggs, a little bit of salt, pepper, some mexi cheese. Oh my gosh, that used to be so great. But whatever I cooked it it would burn every time and then I start I can start doing it like how she does it. I still get a little bit I used to always be like how do you do it so perfect. There was no residue there was something on it. I was like wow. Another one I could say is sometimes when I cook my salmon too. I crisp it up a little bit and I like to do that because my dad loves crunchy salmon somehow and so I try my best and then I always set off the alarm. I tend to set off the alarm and I'm sauteeing things a lot.

Michael Dugan:

Oh you mean the smoke alarm?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

It's not totally terrible, but it's like oh beep beep So we always have to open the window but then this name is good. So it's worth it for the food. It is worth it.

Michael Dugan:

Okay, so here's another question for you. What would be your desert island dish? If you were stuck on a desert island? What would you bring? Oh, that's so hard. I love a variety. you get one

Olivia Kent-Horton:

just one dish. Just one dish. Two, I want to make it a comfort food. I think I'd say one of my favorites is teriyaki salmon with rice seasoned rice and asparagus, salted asparagus and then artichoke as a dessert. Which sounds really weird, but I love artichoke. I think I will go for that. Okay,

Michael Dugan:

but what would you bring for dessert? Oh, to get one more.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

One more. Ooh, yay. Oh, I'm going to go for comfort when I love fall. I love fall flavors. I love me some apples and cinnamon. So I think I would go with just my regular Apple affiliate. I call it Philly because I'm not the biggest fan of pie. So I take cinnamon, some cinnamon sugar, some lemon juice, some orange juice. With apples. I put them in the oven for a little bit on medium heat because I want it to be a little crunchy. And then I will just mix them together and they turn into this apple pie feeling sort of. So I think I would bring that I love that.

Michael Dugan:

This is your own dish.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

Yeah, it's my own dish when I was little I remember everyone used to love because at my other house we are cooking a lot. And for recipes. They have all these cool recipes, but I remember specifically they would always love pie and I was like you guys, I'm not a big fan of pie. So I take the extra apples I would add it wherever I wanted into my own little concoction and then I think I perfected my recipe recently. And just every fall I just put it in a mug. Sometimes you can just put your apples in a mug season and just put them in the microwave for a little bit and it's just happy I eat it would study. It was just my own favorite dessert since no one else would make me chocolate cake or something.

Michael Dugan:

So is there anything that you can share with us? With our audience with me about what you've learned about cooking? If if there's someone out there that might want to really start jumping into cooking? Is there any advice you can give? Oh,

Olivia Kent-Horton:

any advice? I would say just start you know every person's got their own little situation, their own era that they're living in their own experiences. But with that perspective, I would just cook I mean even if you're not totally into cooking, you're like, oh my gosh, it's not my favorite. Do some meal prep. I mean, cooking is meant to be experienced by everyone whether you're eating it or whether you're actually cooking and I think just starting would be perfect. And if you're still in quarantine, do it take the time of quarantine to get yourself a little bit more on track or you just go above and beyond. I mean for me, quarantine gave me a lot of time to just say I What are my interests and what aren't. And cooking and Mixology came in there and with that I was able to get creative. I mean I was able to say okay, I know I don't like this but how can I make this better? I know I haven't tried this feel how can I do it now? And also just practice I feel like cooking is cooking. It's kind of one of those you want to have that talent or at least something good for you. And if it comes into like culture, I think experience experiencing other people's culture sharing that is just a beautiful thing. So just do it.

Michael Dugan:

Well as we wrap up today. I wanted to do something really special. So you're you're 16 and you're still young you have an amazing passion to study cooking, and learn about cooking and you're an incredible cook and at Oh, absolutely. We've We've talked a little bit about it. And I know you were thinking about the idea of possibly studying to be a chef or when you start working to kind of work your way into a kitchen and a country club or something like that. What I want to offer is, if any of our listeners are interested in connecting to Olivia about that she's got an incredible passion she truly talented at cooking and she knows what she's doing. So how would they reach out to you?

Olivia Kent-Horton:

We'll give my email. Okay, and it's Olivia05kh@gmail.com.

Michael Dugan:

I want to thank you for coming on the show today. Olivia, I know that we've been talking about this for a long time and I'm just really excited that we had a chance to have this conversation.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

This was great. I mean, I'm excited to get more in with the cooking community, the food community. It's just great. Thank you for this opportunity.

Michael Dugan:

Absolutely. And I'll leave you with this quote. From Julia Child. People who love to eat are always the best people.

Olivia Kent-Horton:

That I guess I'm high up there. Thank you.